Can a Pig be a Service Animal – What You Need to Know


Can a Pig be a Service Animal - What You Need to Know

Over the years, we’ve all been accustomed to having service animals like dogs, cats, and the rest here in America and beyond. However, has it ever crossed your mind if a pig could become a service animal? Well, we will get to find that out today.

Undoubtedly, most people love pigs very much. But, the truth is that pigs would make truly horrific, if not wholly hilarious, service animals as a result of the below reasons.

Definition of a Service Animal

A service animal is any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not considered service animals.

American Disabilities Act

Task Performed by a Service Animal

These are some of the Task Service Animals can perform for their owners from teh National ADA

  • Guide people that have vision impairments
  • Guide people that have Hearing Impairments
  • Pulling a Wheel Chair
  • Assisting in Rescue Activities
  • Retrieving lost items, medicine, telephones
  • Providing Stability to individuals that have difficulties with Balance

Where are ADA Approved Service Animals Allowed

  • Into all public areas
  • Into Private Facilities
  • Public Transportations
ESA Status Animals

Pigs Large Size

First of all, an ideal service animal ought to be agile, and in the case of pigs, size is a problem. Pigs are not small animals. Full-sized ones reach about 600lbs, and even mini pigs range anywhere from 100 to like 300 or 400. Even those teacup pigs get to be about 100lbs, despite what those teacup pig breeders will tell you.

Pigs can be Erratic

Another reason why they wouldn’t make a magnificent service animal is that they are by nature very erratic. Plus, they’re incredibly temperamental, don’t like change, and they can deceive and “lie” to get their way into any place.

Yes, pigs are genuinely excellent animals. Some people put them as the 3rd smartest animal after humans, with primates being first and whales/dolphins being second. So it depends on who you ask, but everyone agrees that pigs are one of the smartest living things on the planet.

Nevertheless, that intelligence is used in deceptive ways. Pigs can lie to even humans and other pigs. They can deceive, manipulate, and are very good at it. Also, they get agitated when they’re caught, which then takes us to our next point. 

Pigs Harbor Resentment

Other than being tricky, pigs are very resentful. Put differently; they are incredibly stubborn and pushy. And if a service pig were to go out with his owner, and then decide he’s tired, he wants to go back home, no amount of training or encouragement will change his mind. That’s how hilarious the scenarios would often appear.

Also, they love routine and won’t react well when their routine is interrupted or changed.

Pigs Lack of Agility

Back to our earliest point concerning their agility level, pigs are massive. And that weight is packed onto a very compact, not-super-athletic frame. Have you ever seen a pig run? Honestly, they look hilarious, that big, solid body and those tiny little legs.

Put differently; pigs aren’t built for stamina or agility. This means that, if you need a service animal to open doors or reach things for you, a pig would be an awful choice. And if you’re out running errands for a while, it could get the pig drained because they have no stamina.

Pigs can be Prey

Again, pigs are prey animals, while dogs are predators. And Bacon Lovers….. And generally, predators, especially those with so many years of domestication behind them, tend to be more confident and outgoing in new situations, while a prey animal might be more nervous.

I know you may probably be asking how about horses? Well, yes, horses are prey animals too; however, like dogs, horses have a lot of past years of domestication that helps override their instincts, which then takes us to our next reason.

Lack High Levels of Domestication

Pigs are not widely domesticated. They’re farm animals. They don’t have a lot of human interaction, aside from being fed or having their pen cleaned, vet checks, and so on. How often do you see a pig cuddling with someone on the couch or sleep at the foot of their beds? Not so much. Generally, they’re not widely viewed as companion animals.

So, they’re still more in tune with their instincts than dogs and horses, which means they can be unpredictable in unfamiliar situations.

Don’t get me wrong, I, as many other Americans love pigs. Indeed, they’re very cool, and they love human interaction and affection. But to be honest, they would utterly a disaster as service animals.

And instead of forcing them to be service animals, one can get them to be either be a therapy animal or emotional support animal.

Pigs as Therapy or Emotional Support Animals

As said I’ve been saying since the beginning of this write-up, pigs are incredibly intelligent and sensitive animals, which can make them candidates for therapy animals or emotional support animals. However, one needs to understand that these two tasks are different. 

Emotional Support Pig

Support Therapy Animals

A therapy animal is a privately owned animal that is not controlled by any state or federal law. They can be any form of an animal, and contracted by 501c3 therapy organizations. Once you have a therapy animal, you can take them with you to schools, hospitals, nursing homes, libraries as volunteers providing therapy to others through with comfort, affection, and attention.

Emotional Support Animals

ES ( Emotional Support ) animals, on the other hand, are kinds of animals that aid in relieving an owner’s symptoms of a disability. And while dogs work best in this situation, a pig can also do the same. 

How Pigs Can Serve in Both Capacity

Currently, especially in America, some pig owners often choose to share their pig with their community schools and nursing homes. Spreading smiles and laughter with fundraisers and events centered around their pigs.

Pigs have been recognized by families of children with autism to help with vocalization and calming. They have been known to detect low blood sugar in their owners with diabetes or detect and warn of oncoming seizures. They can ease anxiety and panic attacks and improve the symptoms of depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder in some individuals.

However, you need to understand that all these traits

Does not mean that a pig can legally be considered a service animal.

In a nutshell, pigs are one of the most wonderful and intelligent animals that walk the foot of this earth. However, given that they are erratic by nature, very resentful, and have less stamina compared to other pet animals like dogs, it would be an awful choice to make your pig, a service animal. Instead, they could be used as either a therapy animal or an emotional support animal. I hope this article helped quench your thoughts on whether or not pigs could become service animals.

How to Get an Emotional Support Pig

This is where Support Animals / Emotional Support Animals are Registered

Guide to Getting an Emotional Support Animal found Here

Here is article about emotional Support Pigs, its conclusion is that you need to bguy and train one it that is what you like, these are some of the traits you will need to have in your pig. If that is the direction you want to take there are some things that would be wise in training one

  • Friendly Nature – Animals have individual natures – you want one that has a gentle nature
  • Probably Neutered / Spayed to reduce territorial mating tendencies
  • Smaller size pig – Pigs can range from 100lbs – 600lb Large animals are hard to control or guide
  • Tusk removal
  • Leash Training
  • Emotional Support Animals Pricing

Explosion of Emotional Support Animals

Explosion of Emotional Support Animals

World Pig Breeder Associations

Pig AssociationLocationLink
National Swine RegistryUnited StatesNSR
American BerkshireIllinoisAB
Livestock ConservancyNorth CarolinaLC
American Mini Pig AssociationUnited StatesAMPA
Southern California Association of Pot Bellied PigsCaliforniaSCAPBP
British Pig AssociationUKBPA
National Pig AssociationUKNPA
Canadian Swine Breeders AssociationsCanadaCSBA
Australian Pig Breeders AssociationsAustraliaAPBA

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